Festival in the Park

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Roanoke’s 40th annual Festival in the Park featured food, music, children’s activities, arts and crafts, plenty of sun, a little rain and even a “Roanoke Star” talent contest. Event Zone executive director Larry Landolt admitted that his staff and the volunteers that help stage the Festival were “dragging a bit” by Monday, the last of five days of events. Music-wise the Festival ended Monday night, as usual, with 1964: the Tribute, the popular Beatles tribute band. Landolt called Saturday’s concert by Dickey Betts and Great Southern “something special,” admitting that the former Allman Brothers guitarist may have played past the city’s noise ordinance curfew. “No one came to shut us down,” said Landolt with a grin.
Roanoke’s 40th annual Festival in the Park featured food, music, children’s activities, arts and crafts, plenty of sun, a little rain and even a “Roanoke Star” talent contest.  Event Zone executive director Larry Landolt admitted that his staff and the volunteers that help stage the Festival were “dragging a bit” by Monday, the last of five days of events. Music-wise the Festival ended Monday night, as usual, with 1964: the Tribute, the popular Beatles tribute band. Landolt called Saturday’s concert by Dickey Betts and Great Southern “something special,” admitting that the former Allman Brothers guitarist may have played past the city’s noise ordinance curfew. “No one came to shut us down,” said Landolt with a grin.
Roanoke’s 40th annual Festival in the Park featured food, music, children’s activities, arts and crafts, plenty of sun, a little rain and even a “Roanoke Star” talent contest. Event Zone executive director Larry Landolt admitted that his staff and the volunteers that help stage the Festival were “dragging a bit” by Monday, the last of five days of events. Music-wise the Festival ended Monday night, as usual, with 1964: the Tribute, the popular Beatles tribute band. Landolt called Saturday’s concert by Dickey Betts and Great Southern “something special,” admitting that the former Allman Brothers guitarist may have played past the city’s noise ordinance curfew. “No one came to shut us down,” said Landolt with a grin.